GPR Concrete Scanning – Atlanta, GA

GPR Concrete Scanning – Atlanta, Georgia – March 2017

Ground Penetrating Radar Systems, Inc. (GPRS) was contacted to perform a GPR survey at a high rise building in Atlanta, GA. GPRS was asked to determine the location of reinforcing, conduits, or any other potential obstructions prior to core drilling in multiple locations.

Ryan Abueg was the technician from GPRS that arrived on site to complete this project. Prior to arriving on site, the locations had been laid out using the orange “X’s” that can be seen in the photos. Using the 1600MHz GPR antenna, any anomalies that were found were marked directly on the surface using a black marker. Once each location was surveyed, the findings were then explained to the contractor in order to develop a safe plan for the drilling.

The photos included depict the final markup of two of the areas of concern that were brought up by the contractor onsite. As mentioned before, the proposed core locations were laid out prior to GPRS arriving on site. If these areas were cored before they were surveyed, there may have been serious damage done to the structure or lead to severe injury to the workers present. GPRS recommends that a GPR survey be performed prior to any cutting or drilling being performed.

GPR Concrete Scanning – Atlanta, Georgia – March 20172

GPR is a safe alternative to a costly repair to conduits or post tension cables damaged by drilling. GPR emits no radiation and poses no health hazards. Any findings are marked in real time directly onto the surface with no processing time which allows the contractor to begin drilling immediately after a survey. GPR is frequently used to scan the ground to determine location of underground utilities and underground storage tanks as well.   Ryan Abueg is the GPRS contact based in Atlanta, GA and he can be reached at 678.920.2842 or by email at ryan.abueg@gprsinc.com.

A “Void”ing Danger

GPRS Project Manager Matthew Franklin scans with the GSSI SIR 4000 and 400 MHZ Radar to locate the full extent of the void.

GPRS Project Manager Matthew Franklin scans with the GSSI SIR 4000 and 400 MHZ Radar to locate the full extent of the void.

Underground voids can be extremely dangerous and can lead to severe property and personal damage. Recently GPRS was called to identify the extent of a void found within a subdivision in downtown Atlanta. The void was created by a leaking water pipe which washed out the soil under the slab, causing it to collapse in several areas. GPRS was asked to mark the boundaries of the void as well as scan for any other possible voids throughout the property.

Using the 400 MHZ Radar and the SIR 4000, GPRS was able to successfully identify the range of the known voids and how far they had spread unseen under the ground. Often, voids encompass a larger area than above ground identifiers, such as cracks in the concrete, would indicate. We were also able to detect other zones throughout the neighborhood that could contain possible voids.

Identifying areas of interest allows our clients to focus future investigations and efforts to solve the problem without having to waste time and money on exploring areas that are unaffected by voids. Ground penetrating radar is one of the best ways to identify voids as the process is noninvasive and does not rely on destructive techniques to produce results.

– Patrick Moulin, Project Manager Atlanta

GPR Concrete Scanning – Atlanta, GA

GPR Concrete Scanning – Atlanta, Georgia – February 2017

Ground Penetrating Radar Systems, Inc. (GPRS) was contacted to perform a GPR survey at a high rise building in Atlanta, GA. GPRS was asked to determine the location of reinforcing, conduits, or any other potential obstructions prior to core drilling in multiple locations.

Ryan Abueg was the technician from GPRS that arrived on site to complete this project. Prior to arriving on site, the locations had been laid out using the pink “X’s” that can be seen in the photos. Using the 1600MHz GPR antenna, any anomalies that were found were marked directly on the surface using a black marker. Once each location was surveyed, the findings were then explained to the contractor in order to develop a safe plan for the drilling.

The photos included depicts the final markup of two of the areas of concern that was brought up by the contractor onsite. As mentioned before, the proposed core locations were laid out prior to GPRS arriving on site. If these areas were cored before they were surveyed, there may have been serious damage done to the structure. GPRS recommends that a GPR survey be performed prior to any cutting or drilling be performed.

GPR Concrete Scanning – Atlanta, Georgia – February 2017-2

GPR is a safe alternative to a costly repair to conduits or post tension cables damaged by drilling. GPR emits no radiation and poses no health hazards. Any findings are marked in real time directly onto the surface with no processing time which allows the contractor to begin drilling immediately after a survey. GPR is frequently used to scan the ground to determine location of underground utilities and underground storage tanks as well. Ryan Abueg is the GPRS contact based in Atlanta, GA and he can be reached at 678.920.2842 or by email at ryan.abueg@gprsinc.com.

GPR Concrete Scanning – Atlanta, Georgia

Atlanta, Georgia – March 2017_1Ground Penetrating Radar Systems, Inc. (GPRS) was contacted to perform a GPR survey at a high-rise building in Atlanta, GA. GPRS was asked to determine the location of reinforcing, conduits, or any other potential obstructions prior to core drilling in multiple locations.

Ryan Abueg was the technician from GPRS that arrived onsite to complete this project. Prior to arriving on site, the locations had been laid out using the orange “X’s” that can be seen in the photos. Using the 1600MHz GPR antenna, any anomalies that were found were marked directly on the surface using a black marker. Once each location was surveyed, the findings were then explained to the contractor in order to develop a safe plan for the drilling.

The photos included depict the final markup of two of the areas of concern that were brought up by the contractor onsite. As mentioned before, the proposed core locations were laid out prior to GPRS arriving onsite. If these areas were cored before they were surveyed, there may have been serious damage done to the structure or lead to severe injury to the workers present. GPRS recommends that a GPR survey be performed prior to any cutting or drilling be performed.
Atlanta, Georgia – March 2017_2alternative to a costly repair to conduits or post tension cables damaged by drilling. GPR emits no radiation and poses no health hazards. Any findings are marked in real time directly onto the surface with no processing time which allows the contractor to begin drilling immediately after a survey. GPR is frequently used to scan the ground to determine location of underground utilities and underground storage tanks as well.

Ryan Abueg is the GPRS contact based in Atlanta, GA and he can be reached at 678.920.2842 or by email at ryan.abueg@gp-radar.com.

Airport Utility Survey in Atlanta Georgia

GPR Airport Utility Survey

Ground Penetrating Radar Systems, Inc. (GPRS) was contacted to perform a GPR survey at the Hartsfield-Jackson Airport in Atlanta, GA. GPRS was asked to determine the location of conduits and other obstructions prior to future construction plans.

Ryan Abueg was the technician from GPRS that arrived on site to complete this project. Once the initial walk-down of the site was performed with the contractors, Ryan began the GPR survey. Using the 400MHz GPR antenna, any anomalies that were found were marked directly on the surface using color-coded marking paint. Once each location was surveyed, the findings were then explained to the contractor in order to develop a safe plan for the future construction plans.

GPR Airport Utility Survey 2

The photos included depict the final markup of areas of concern that wwere brought up by the contractor onsite. If these areas were worked on before they were surveyed, there may have been serious damage done to the structure or lead to severe injury to the workers present. GPRS recommends that a GPR survey be performed prior to any cutting, drilling, excavation to be performed.

GPR is a safe alternative to a costly repair to underground utilities and underground storage tanks. GPR emits no radiation and poses no health hazards. Any findings are marked in real time directly onto the surface with no processing time which allows the contractor to begin diggin immediately after a survey. GPR is frequently used to scan the ground to determine location of post tension and other reinforcing in concrete as well. Ryan Abueg is the GPRS contact based in Atlanta, GA and he can be reached at 678.920.2842 or by email at ryan.abueg@gp-radar.com.

Prairie Cemetery project underway

Land owner Jim Moore, of Jonesboro, assures Brenda Hutcheson that there will be plenty of land for potential fencing when project is completed, along with Josh Sneed, Brandin Mathis, Wayne Couch and Ethan King.

Land owner Jim Moore, of Jonesboro, assures Brenda Hutcheson that there will be plenty of land for potential fencing when project is completed, along with Josh Sneed, Brandin Mathis, Wayne Couch and Ethan King.

The ancient Prairie Cemetery, south of Lake City, is being examined from above and below to find graves of loved ones buried there.

Riverside teacher and Lake City councilwoman Brenda Hutcheson spearheaded a project in January to reclaim the overgrown cemetery on County Road 812, one-and-a-half miles east of Lunsford.

“The cemetery has been overgrown with vines and brush for years,” Hutcheson said. “My husband Donnie (Hutcheson) and I were raised in the Prairie Community, and wanted to do something about cleaning it up. We only found two stone headstones at first, but remember there being over 20. Many markers had been wood and they were gone.

“We contacted Craighead County Judge Ed Hill about getting help from the county road crew to remove the thicket covering the cemetery. The road crew brought heavy equipment and removed 30 dump trucks of brush and debris.”

GPR specialist Ethan King, center, reviews information of scanning with Wilma and Ron Freeman.

GPR specialist Ethan King, center, reviews information of scanning with Wilma and Ron Freeman.

Hearing the story on KAIT-TV, Mike McGuirt, a teacher at Westside, brought his drone to the Prairie Cemetery to take photos before the county workers began and afterwards when the property had been cleared.

Volunteers came to the cemetery on Saturdays during February and March to rake and clean the surface of the cemetery. They probed for unmarked graves and located a third stone marker and a metal grave stake. ASU Archeologist Dr. Julia Morrow and her assistant Brandy Dacus examined the cemetery and advised Hutcheson as how to document the findings.

“Calls came in from everywhere giving me information about loved ones buried there,” Hutcheson said. “This has helped us uncover a lot of information about the people who lived in this area, as well as nearby schools, and organizations. Our desire is to give those buried here a proper resting place.”

Surveyor Michael Daniels, with the Bureau of Land Management, visited the site to look for what was first believed to be a section marker. The marker turned out to be the base of another tombstone.

Wilma Johnson Freeman, of Jonesboro, contacted Hutcheson to report five members of her Watkins family were buried there from 1892 through 1913.

“Wilma and her husband Ron Freeman came to the cemetery in hopes of finding the unmarked graves of their family,” Hutcheson said. “The Watkins family was willing to sponsor the cost to hire GPR scanning of the cemetery to find graves. Mrs. Freeman contacted Ethan King, project manager with Ground Penetrating Radar Systems, out of Little Rock, and he did the work last Saturday.”

King found 14 more grave sites on the cemetery property, much to the pleasure of the Freeman and Watkins family.

Ethan King completed GPR scanning at the cemetery Saturday.

Ethan King completed GPR scanning at the cemetery Saturday.

“We believe we have found our Watkins family members on the south end of the Prairie Cemetery,” Mrs. Freeman said. “My cousin Sandra Whitmire and her friend Dwight Baker have already placed the cemetery on the Find-A-Grave site, listing the three headstone names, with hopes of soon adding our Watkins family to the listing.”

“Donnie’s cousin Harold Hutcheson, owner of Hutco Inc. of Paragould, also lived in this community growing up and has offered to construct an arched metal sign with the cemetery’s name on it after work is completed,” Brenda Hutcheson said. “He and his wife Viva came over here to work and have been great supporters of the project.

“Landowner Jim Moore has pledged his support in making sure we have enough space to clear the property and erect a fence when work is completed,” she said. “It didn’t take us long to see how interested people are in the work being done here. Even students from Riverside School and ASU came out to work. Local farmer Lynn Nall helped level the site for mowing at a later date.

“Now we are just waiting for the printout with the GPR results so we can purchase small concrete markers to identify the found grave sites. When we are finished we want to list the names of all those buried here on a marker near the metal arch out front. We are trying to raise money to pay for those and have already received several donations.”

GPRS Used to Locate Utilities at 2 Schools in Nashville

Ground Penetrating Radar Systems’ Nashville, TN office was recently utilized on two separate projects to locate underground utilities at local schools.  McMurray Middle school is planning renovations and additions across the property. The environmental company hired to oversee the project hired GPRS to scan for and locate utilities not only in the areas that were slated for soil borings, but also for expansion areas.  Over the course of 2 days, GPRS scanned several acres on the school property and were able to clear the soil boring locations but also to identify several of the utilities in question, including primary water, power and gas services, secondary power, sanitary and data/comm lines to and from multiple buildings.  Working directly with the environmental company, GPRS was able to scan alternate areas when the soil boring crew hit refusal on bedrock. All findings were marked with paint/flags so they could easily be identified.

Electric, Data and Sanitary lines at McMurray on left and Gas at Marvin Wright on right.
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GPRS also recently worked with a local building contractor to locate and mark the underground gas line from the tank into Marvin Wright Elementary.  Drawings showed two gas entry points on two opposite wings of the school.  GPRS was able to locate the line from the tank to one entrance via the use of active mode electromagnetic induction.  The second line had no tracer wire but Ground Penetrating Radar technology was able to accurately locate the 2” plastic line at a depth of approximately 3’-4’, thus preserving the line from destruction by heavy equipment.

Radar technology used by GPRS
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GPRS uses non-destructive testing equipment to locate utilities, piping, power-lines, underground storage tanks, and grave sites that are unable to be seen. Using GPRS is a safe, cost effective way to make sure you can safely drill or dig and not destroy any underground utilities or determine if USTs exist on a property.

Other services we offer are: Post-Tension Cable Location, Conduit Mapping, Rebar Mapping, Void Location and more. GPRS is a nationwide company with local project managers in over 50 cities.  If GPR services are needed in Central Tennessee, contact Casey Barefield at 615.418.4023 or casey.barefield@gp-radar.com.  Also visit www.gp-radar.com for a directory, to view important information about our company, or request more information about how we can serve you on your project.

YOU’RE SAFE!

Safe

Before the installation of a handrail for a grand staircase, Ground Penetrating Radar was brought to the future Comcast Office overlooking the new Atlanta Braves baseball stadium.

The goal was to locate all reinforcing found within the slab and to identify the post tension cables so that they would not be struck when installing the anchors for the handrail. Our GPRS consultant was able to properly identify the different types of reinforcing surrounding the nine floors of the stair case using the 1600 MHz antenna which is capable of penetrating concrete up to 18” thick. The antenna relays its signal to a SIR-3000 computer system which displays the geophysical data.

When found, the reinforcing was marked on the surface of the concrete with a wax marker per the customer’s request. This was to allow for visible marks on the surface that would still be easily cleaned after the installation. GPRS technicians can mark findings using a variety of materials including permanent marker, marking paint, flags, wax marker, tape and chalk. This allows us to showcase our results and give our customers markings that will stay for as long as they would like.

If you would like a price or quote for a slab on grade, elevated slab, or structural scan to locate reinforcing and conduits, please visit the “contact us” page at www.gp-radar.com to contact your local GPRS representative.

– Patrick Moulin, Project Manager, Georgia

Locating and Mapping Utilities for Consulting Company

Locating and Mapping Utilities for Consulting CompanyGround Penetrating Radar Systems was recently contacted by a consulting company to locate and map all utilities, as well as investigate a possible underground storage tank at their site on historic Meeting Street in Charleston, SC prior to drilling on site to collect soil samples.

GPRS used the latest ground penetrating technology to provide relevant information about critical utilities, and other potentially dangerous, and problematic areas underground while on site.

The equipment used in the survey was:

  • GSSI Ground Penetrating Radar/ SIR 3000 – This device transmits an electromagnetic pulse through the ground and displays the reflection on a screen for interpretation.
    • 400 MHz antenna – This antenna allows for GPR signal penetration 4’-8’ through the ground.
  • RD-7000 locator – This device detects live power and RF signals underground, allowing us to locate electrical or telephone lines even if they are below the minimum size requirements to be detected by GPR.  It also allows us to detect utilities via induction or conduction with an exposed or known surface of the conductive utility.

While on site, GPRS technician James Ross, scanned approximately 2000 square feet to identify any anomalies that would indicate electrical conduits, water mains, gas lines, and any other pertinent utilities moving through the customers anticipated boring locations. After further investigation at the suspected site we were able to determine that there were underground utilities running through the proposed drilling zone. GPRS plotted the locations of subsurface obstructions directly onto the surface, and provided accurate depths giving the contractor a clear indication of where it was safe to drill borings, as well as where extra caution would be necessary.

Not only did we ensure the safety of the crew by identifying potential life threatening hazards, but also eliminated any potential costly repairs that may have been added to their project due to damaging unknown utilities.

If you would like a price or quote for an underground utility locate, slab on grade, elevated slab, or structural scan to locate important embedments, please visit the “contact us” page at www.gp-radar.com to contact your local GPRS representative.

Local Contact:
James Ross – South Carolina & Coastal Georgia Project Manager
James.Ross@gp-radar.com
843-312-6662