GPRS Scans for Post-Tension Cables and Conduits in Slab

Ground Penetrating Radar Systems’ Nashville, TN office recently worked with a local plumbing company to help them locate several areas suitable for core drilling through an elevated concrete slab.  Working in a new residential building in The Wedgewood area of Nashville, a plumbing company needed to re-position several proposed core drilling locations to accommodate drains and water lines for kitchen and bathroom amenities.  Many of the current locations were in or under existing walls and/or beams, making the prospect of coring in these areas very difficult.  Rather than accept this risk or expend extra time and resources to have the site plans revised, the plumbing company coordinated with GPRS to scan the proposed areas and mark out rebar, post-tension cables and conduits directly on the slab. GPRS worked to troubleshoot the locations and, when necessary, advised moving the drilling locations to lower-risk areas.  Fast and accurate, the GPRS scanning method prevented any further delays to the project that would have been caused if the plans had to be re-engineered and re-designed in order to reduce risk of striking reinforcement in the slab.  Scanning and interpretation are in real-time, so project managers can instantly receive results, relay them to their team members, and make necessary adjustments on site without causing any delays.

GPRS uses non-destructive testing equipment to locate piping, post-tension cables, reinforcement, and conduits within the slab that are otherwise unable to be seen.  Using GPRS is a safe, efficient, cost effective way to make sure you can safely drill or saw-cut and not destroy any conduits, rebar, post-tension cables, or other anomalies in concrete.

GPRS Scans for Post-Tension Cables and Conduits in Slab

Other services we offer are: Underground Utility Mapping, Underground Tank Location, Concrete Analysis, Rebar Mapping, Void Location and more.  GPRS is a nation-wide company with local project managers in over 50 cities.  If GPR services are needed in Central Tennessee, contact Casey Barefield at 615.418.4023 or casey.barefield@gprsinc.com.  Also visit www.gprsinc.com for a directory, to view important information about our company, or request more information about how we can serve you on your project.

All Clear in Aisle 3

Before the removal on the concrete slab in a local grocery store, the Atlanta office of Ground Penetration Radar Systems was called in to help identify any potential underground conduits or shallow utilities. The store was installing new refrigeration lines and the area needed to be scanned before the concrete was saw cut.

Using the 1600 MHz radar and the SIR 3000 we were able to locate refrigeration lines, power lines and other unknown anomalies that would have been struck during the saw cutting process if not identified ahead of time. GPRS was able to successfully map out all potential underground conduits and utilities with great accuracy. As you can see in the photos, we were able to identify the pvc lines before saw cutting. By giving estimated depths and locations, we allowed the contractor to saw cut with precision and speed. Ground penetrating radar is an essential tool before any excavation process to ensure a safe job site and eliminating the cost and hassle of fixing hit utilities.

Patrick Moulin
Project Manager – Georgia

All Clear in Aisle 3-1

All Clear in Aisle 3-2

What happens when an elevator gets shut down on a 9-story building renovation?

elevator

What happens when an elevator gets shut down on a 9-story building renovation? Put up a temporary elevator on the outside…Buck Hoist. But before the buck hoist can be installed, it must be anchored. Before it gets anchored, the concrete needs to be scanned to keep the structure and the buck hoist secure.

GPRS was called on to scan for the buck hoist anchors during a renovation of a dorm building at UNC Charlotte. The areas for the anchors were successfully scanned, and the anchors for the buck hoist were installed without touching any rebar.

To complete this job safely, the general contractor drilled holes in the corner of each room, so that any worker in the room could use a temporary concrete wedge anchor connected to a self-retracting lifeline (yo-yo). This made transitioning from room to room quick, efficient, and safe.

The equipment used to scan was the 2GHz Palm GPR antenna. This antenna provides high-resolution images at depths up to 12-15 inches, depending on concrete conditions. The smaller profile allows scanning in tighter spaces than normal GPR concrete antennas. The 4000 SIR unit was used to receive the radar signal and display the signal on its screen. This equipment along with the experience of GPRS project managers lead to accurate and helpful findings.

Upon completion of the job, a job summary report is sent giving information on the work that was done: site specific information, findings, equipment used, and advice for safely proceeding with the job.

If you find yourself in need of concrete scanning or private utility locating, you will be able to benefit from our services. Our level of service and professionalism has led to an extremely high level of customer retention. For more information about our services or to hear from our customers, check out our website gprsinc.com

GPR Concrete Scanning – Atlanta, GA

GPR Concrete Scanning – Atlanta, Georgia – March 2017

Ground Penetrating Radar Systems, Inc. (GPRS) was contacted to perform a GPR survey at a high rise building in Atlanta, GA. GPRS was asked to determine the location of reinforcing, conduits, or any other potential obstructions prior to core drilling in multiple locations.

Ryan Abueg was the technician from GPRS that arrived on site to complete this project. Prior to arriving on site, the locations had been laid out using the orange “X’s” that can be seen in the photos. Using the 1600MHz GPR antenna, any anomalies that were found were marked directly on the surface using a black marker. Once each location was surveyed, the findings were then explained to the contractor in order to develop a safe plan for the drilling.

The photos included depict the final markup of two of the areas of concern that were brought up by the contractor onsite. As mentioned before, the proposed core locations were laid out prior to GPRS arriving on site. If these areas were cored before they were surveyed, there may have been serious damage done to the structure or lead to severe injury to the workers present. GPRS recommends that a GPR survey be performed prior to any cutting or drilling being performed.

GPR Concrete Scanning – Atlanta, Georgia – March 20172

GPR is a safe alternative to a costly repair to conduits or post tension cables damaged by drilling. GPR emits no radiation and poses no health hazards. Any findings are marked in real time directly onto the surface with no processing time which allows the contractor to begin drilling immediately after a survey. GPR is frequently used to scan the ground to determine location of underground utilities and underground storage tanks as well.   Ryan Abueg is the GPRS contact based in Atlanta, GA and he can be reached at 678.920.2842 or by email at ryan.abueg@gprsinc.com.

A “Void”ing Danger

GPRS Project Manager Matthew Franklin scans with the GSSI SIR 4000 and 400 MHZ Radar to locate the full extent of the void.

GPRS Project Manager Matthew Franklin scans with the GSSI SIR 4000 and 400 MHZ Radar to locate the full extent of the void.

Underground voids can be extremely dangerous and can lead to severe property and personal damage. Recently GPRS was called to identify the extent of a void found within a subdivision in downtown Atlanta. The void was created by a leaking water pipe which washed out the soil under the slab, causing it to collapse in several areas. GPRS was asked to mark the boundaries of the void as well as scan for any other possible voids throughout the property.

Using the 400 MHZ Radar and the SIR 4000, GPRS was able to successfully identify the range of the known voids and how far they had spread unseen under the ground. Often, voids encompass a larger area than above ground identifiers, such as cracks in the concrete, would indicate. We were also able to detect other zones throughout the neighborhood that could contain possible voids.

Identifying areas of interest allows our clients to focus future investigations and efforts to solve the problem without having to waste time and money on exploring areas that are unaffected by voids. Ground penetrating radar is one of the best ways to identify voids as the process is noninvasive and does not rely on destructive techniques to produce results.

– Patrick Moulin, Project Manager Atlanta

GPR Concrete Scanning – Atlanta, GA

GPR Concrete Scanning – Atlanta, Georgia – February 2017

Ground Penetrating Radar Systems, Inc. (GPRS) was contacted to perform a GPR survey at a high rise building in Atlanta, GA. GPRS was asked to determine the location of reinforcing, conduits, or any other potential obstructions prior to core drilling in multiple locations.

Ryan Abueg was the technician from GPRS that arrived on site to complete this project. Prior to arriving on site, the locations had been laid out using the pink “X’s” that can be seen in the photos. Using the 1600MHz GPR antenna, any anomalies that were found were marked directly on the surface using a black marker. Once each location was surveyed, the findings were then explained to the contractor in order to develop a safe plan for the drilling.

The photos included depicts the final markup of two of the areas of concern that was brought up by the contractor onsite. As mentioned before, the proposed core locations were laid out prior to GPRS arriving on site. If these areas were cored before they were surveyed, there may have been serious damage done to the structure. GPRS recommends that a GPR survey be performed prior to any cutting or drilling be performed.

GPR Concrete Scanning – Atlanta, Georgia – February 2017-2

GPR is a safe alternative to a costly repair to conduits or post tension cables damaged by drilling. GPR emits no radiation and poses no health hazards. Any findings are marked in real time directly onto the surface with no processing time which allows the contractor to begin drilling immediately after a survey. GPR is frequently used to scan the ground to determine location of underground utilities and underground storage tanks as well. Ryan Abueg is the GPRS contact based in Atlanta, GA and he can be reached at 678.920.2842 or by email at ryan.abueg@gprsinc.com.

GPR Concrete Scanning – Atlanta, Georgia

Atlanta, Georgia – March 2017_1Ground Penetrating Radar Systems, Inc. (GPRS) was contacted to perform a GPR survey at a high-rise building in Atlanta, GA. GPRS was asked to determine the location of reinforcing, conduits, or any other potential obstructions prior to core drilling in multiple locations.

Ryan Abueg was the technician from GPRS that arrived onsite to complete this project. Prior to arriving on site, the locations had been laid out using the orange “X’s” that can be seen in the photos. Using the 1600MHz GPR antenna, any anomalies that were found were marked directly on the surface using a black marker. Once each location was surveyed, the findings were then explained to the contractor in order to develop a safe plan for the drilling.

The photos included depict the final markup of two of the areas of concern that were brought up by the contractor onsite. As mentioned before, the proposed core locations were laid out prior to GPRS arriving onsite. If these areas were cored before they were surveyed, there may have been serious damage done to the structure or lead to severe injury to the workers present. GPRS recommends that a GPR survey be performed prior to any cutting or drilling be performed.
Atlanta, Georgia – March 2017_2alternative to a costly repair to conduits or post tension cables damaged by drilling. GPR emits no radiation and poses no health hazards. Any findings are marked in real time directly onto the surface with no processing time which allows the contractor to begin drilling immediately after a survey. GPR is frequently used to scan the ground to determine location of underground utilities and underground storage tanks as well.

Ryan Abueg is the GPRS contact based in Atlanta, GA and he can be reached at 678.920.2842 or by email at ryan.abueg@gp-radar.com.

Airport Utility Survey in Atlanta Georgia

GPR Airport Utility Survey

Ground Penetrating Radar Systems, Inc. (GPRS) was contacted to perform a GPR survey at the Hartsfield-Jackson Airport in Atlanta, GA. GPRS was asked to determine the location of conduits and other obstructions prior to future construction plans.

Ryan Abueg was the technician from GPRS that arrived on site to complete this project. Once the initial walk-down of the site was performed with the contractors, Ryan began the GPR survey. Using the 400MHz GPR antenna, any anomalies that were found were marked directly on the surface using color-coded marking paint. Once each location was surveyed, the findings were then explained to the contractor in order to develop a safe plan for the future construction plans.

GPR Airport Utility Survey 2

The photos included depict the final markup of areas of concern that wwere brought up by the contractor onsite. If these areas were worked on before they were surveyed, there may have been serious damage done to the structure or lead to severe injury to the workers present. GPRS recommends that a GPR survey be performed prior to any cutting, drilling, excavation to be performed.

GPR is a safe alternative to a costly repair to underground utilities and underground storage tanks. GPR emits no radiation and poses no health hazards. Any findings are marked in real time directly onto the surface with no processing time which allows the contractor to begin diggin immediately after a survey. GPR is frequently used to scan the ground to determine location of post tension and other reinforcing in concrete as well. Ryan Abueg is the GPRS contact based in Atlanta, GA and he can be reached at 678.920.2842 or by email at ryan.abueg@gp-radar.com.

Prairie Cemetery project underway

Land owner Jim Moore, of Jonesboro, assures Brenda Hutcheson that there will be plenty of land for potential fencing when project is completed, along with Josh Sneed, Brandin Mathis, Wayne Couch and Ethan King.

Land owner Jim Moore, of Jonesboro, assures Brenda Hutcheson that there will be plenty of land for potential fencing when project is completed, along with Josh Sneed, Brandin Mathis, Wayne Couch and Ethan King.

The ancient Prairie Cemetery, south of Lake City, is being examined from above and below to find graves of loved ones buried there.

Riverside teacher and Lake City councilwoman Brenda Hutcheson spearheaded a project in January to reclaim the overgrown cemetery on County Road 812, one-and-a-half miles east of Lunsford.

“The cemetery has been overgrown with vines and brush for years,” Hutcheson said. “My husband Donnie (Hutcheson) and I were raised in the Prairie Community, and wanted to do something about cleaning it up. We only found two stone headstones at first, but remember there being over 20. Many markers had been wood and they were gone.

“We contacted Craighead County Judge Ed Hill about getting help from the county road crew to remove the thicket covering the cemetery. The road crew brought heavy equipment and removed 30 dump trucks of brush and debris.”

GPR specialist Ethan King, center, reviews information of scanning with Wilma and Ron Freeman.

GPR specialist Ethan King, center, reviews information of scanning with Wilma and Ron Freeman.

Hearing the story on KAIT-TV, Mike McGuirt, a teacher at Westside, brought his drone to the Prairie Cemetery to take photos before the county workers began and afterwards when the property had been cleared.

Volunteers came to the cemetery on Saturdays during February and March to rake and clean the surface of the cemetery. They probed for unmarked graves and located a third stone marker and a metal grave stake. ASU Archeologist Dr. Julia Morrow and her assistant Brandy Dacus examined the cemetery and advised Hutcheson as how to document the findings.

“Calls came in from everywhere giving me information about loved ones buried there,” Hutcheson said. “This has helped us uncover a lot of information about the people who lived in this area, as well as nearby schools, and organizations. Our desire is to give those buried here a proper resting place.”

Surveyor Michael Daniels, with the Bureau of Land Management, visited the site to look for what was first believed to be a section marker. The marker turned out to be the base of another tombstone.

Wilma Johnson Freeman, of Jonesboro, contacted Hutcheson to report five members of her Watkins family were buried there from 1892 through 1913.

“Wilma and her husband Ron Freeman came to the cemetery in hopes of finding the unmarked graves of their family,” Hutcheson said. “The Watkins family was willing to sponsor the cost to hire GPR scanning of the cemetery to find graves. Mrs. Freeman contacted Ethan King, project manager with Ground Penetrating Radar Systems, out of Little Rock, and he did the work last Saturday.”

King found 14 more grave sites on the cemetery property, much to the pleasure of the Freeman and Watkins family.

Ethan King completed GPR scanning at the cemetery Saturday.

Ethan King completed GPR scanning at the cemetery Saturday.

“We believe we have found our Watkins family members on the south end of the Prairie Cemetery,” Mrs. Freeman said. “My cousin Sandra Whitmire and her friend Dwight Baker have already placed the cemetery on the Find-A-Grave site, listing the three headstone names, with hopes of soon adding our Watkins family to the listing.”

“Donnie’s cousin Harold Hutcheson, owner of Hutco Inc. of Paragould, also lived in this community growing up and has offered to construct an arched metal sign with the cemetery’s name on it after work is completed,” Brenda Hutcheson said. “He and his wife Viva came over here to work and have been great supporters of the project.

“Landowner Jim Moore has pledged his support in making sure we have enough space to clear the property and erect a fence when work is completed,” she said. “It didn’t take us long to see how interested people are in the work being done here. Even students from Riverside School and ASU came out to work. Local farmer Lynn Nall helped level the site for mowing at a later date.

“Now we are just waiting for the printout with the GPR results so we can purchase small concrete markers to identify the found grave sites. When we are finished we want to list the names of all those buried here on a marker near the metal arch out front. We are trying to raise money to pay for those and have already received several donations.”